Lecture flipping- part 5 (What the students thought)

After 3 lectures in flipped format, I asked the students to take part in a survey and feedback their experience with the approach. About ¼ of students (n=131) responded, a pretty good rate I guess. I tried to ask questions that suggested both positive and negative experiences and asked for responses on a Likert scale.

Having videos available, at least as a learning and revision resource, was almost universally seen as positive, and almost all students liked the videos. The picture was more mixed for the specific use of the resources in flip teaching- not all who liked the videos found that they could learn well from them, and some were not keen on the peer discussion element.

poll1

Given the choice, almost half of all students would prefer the traditional lecture; a small number explicitly said in the free-text response that they learned better that way. I have to admit I was tempted to phrase the question “…rather just let the lecture wash over me while I daydream…”  Many felt a bit bowled over by the concept and the unconventional “lecture” experience.

poll2

The majority of students felt reasonably briefed about the new approach, but some had issues with Nearpod.

poll3

It was reassuring to see that most students at least tried to watch all videos (1-2) relevant to an upcoming lecture even though I only just managed to upload them 2-3 days in advance. Only a small proportion supplemented their online learning with reading. For my generation, that is pretty amazing- textbooks were the starting and often end points of all learning and revision. I have to admit that because I took it for granted, I did not explicitly urge them to read. We do recommend a textbook and even indicate suitable chapter numbers for each lecture, but text book reading has become a niche approach to learning it seems. Then again, if biochemistry is not your main subject you are unlikely to invest £50 in a textbook.

poll4

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